On This Day...

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22.10.2013, 18:23

On This Day...

Quite simple really,Historical events on this dayBig Grin

1964, Sandie Shaw had her first UK No.1 single with the Burt Bacharach song '(There's) Always Some Thing There To Remind Me'.
1964, The Who, then known as The High Numbers, receive a letter from EMI Records, asking them for original material after their recent audition for the company.

1966, The Supremes became the first female group to have a No.1 album on the US char whith 'The Supremes a Go Go', knocking The Beatles 'Revolver', from the top of the charts. 
1966, The Beach Boys ‘Good Vibrations’ made its debut on the US singles chart. Written by Brian Wilson and Mike Love, the track was recorded over 6 weeks in four different Los Angeles studios, at a cost of over $16,000. The recording engineer would later say that the last take sounded exactly like the first, six months earlier. The record would reach No.1 on the US charts in December 1966. 

1969, American singer Tommy Edwards died after suffering a brain aneurysm in Henrico County, Virginia, at the age of 47. Had the 1958 US & UK No.1 single 'It's All In The Game'.
1969, Paul McCartney publicly denied rumors that he was dead. The most recent of many "clues" of this Death Hoax was the fact that he was the only barefoot Beatle on the newly released 'Abby Road' LP cover. The story was actually started as a prank by Fred La Bour, a sports and arts writer for the student paper, The Michigan Daily at the University of Michigan.
1969, Led Zeppelin II was released on Atlantic Records in the UK. The Jimmy Page-produced album which was recorded over six months between four European and three American tours, peaked at No.1 in both the UK and US, going on to sell over 12 million copies in the US alone, (and spending 138 weeks on the UK chart). The album is now recognised by writers and music critics as one of the greatest and most influential rock albums ever recorded.

1986, Jane Dornacker was killed in a helicopter crash during a live traffic report for WNBC radio in New York. Listeners heard the terrified voice of Dornacker screaming "Hit the water, hit the water’ as the helicopter from which she and pilot Bill Pate were reporting, fell from the sky and crashed into the Hudson River. Dornacker had been a member of The Tubes and Leila And The Snakes.

1988, Phil Collins started a two week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Groovy Kind Of Love', his 6th US No.1. 
1988, U2 scored their fourth UK No.1 album with the double set and film soundtrack 'Rattle And Hum', featuring their first UK No.1 single 'Desire'. 

1989, English folk singer, songwriter, poet, and record producer Ewan MacColl died aged 74. He wrote 'Dirty Old Town' and 'The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face', (became a No.1 hit for Roberta Flack in 1972). Acts including Planxty, The Dubliners, Elvis Presley and Johnny Cash recorded his songs. He was the father of singer, songwriter Kirsty MacColl.

1990, Pearl Jam played their first ever concert when they appeared at the Off Ramp in Seattle. 

1993, Oasis signed a six-album deal with Creation Records for a £40,000 advance. 1996, It was announced that, "The Beatles were now bigger than The Beatles". The statement was based on sales so far this year, having sold 6,000,000 albums from their back catalog and a combined total of 13,000,000 copies of ‘The Beatles Anthology 1’ and ‘The Beatles Anthology 2’. With the release of ‘The Beatles Anthology 3’ a week away, it was anticipated that total Beatles album sales for 1996 would exceed 20 million. A poll showed 41 percent of sales were to teenagers who were not born when The Beatles officially called it quits in 1970. 

1999, it was reported that Sinead O'Connor was attempting to buy the church where she was ordained into the Catholic sisterhood. The church was on the market for £70,000. 

2000, George Michael paid £1.45m for the Steinway piano on which John Lennon wrote 'Imagine.' George said, "I know that when my fingers touch the keys of that Steinway, I will feel truly blessed. And parting with my money has never been much of a problem, just ask my accountant." The singer outbid Robbie Williams and The Oasis brothers.
 2000, Pearl Jam appeared at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas, California, celebrating the tenth anniversary of their first live performance as a band.

2003, Elliot Smith, US singer songwriter, committed suicide aged 34. One time member of Stranger Than Fiction, solo 1997 album 'Either/Or'.

2005, Waterloo by Abba was voted the best song in the history of the Eurovision Song Contest. Viewers in 31 countries across Europe voted during a special show in Copenhagen to celebrate the annual event's 50th birthday. 

2008, A homeless man claimed a £2,000 reward by returning a waxwork head of ex-Beatle Sir Paul McCartney which had been left on a train. Anthony Silva found the item in a bin at Reading station after auctioneer Joby Carter left it under a seat at Maidenhead station. The homeless man thought it was a Halloween mask and had been using it as a pillow before realising what it was. The wax model sold the following week for £5,500 at auction.

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11.06.2018, 16:36

Re: On This Day...

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John Wayne dies ...

On this day in 1979, John Wayne, an iconic American film actor famous for starring in countless
westerns, dies at age 72 after battling cancer for more than a decade.

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During four decades of acting, Wayne, with his trademark drawl and good looks, appeared in over 250 films.
He was married three times and had seven children.

24.05.2018, 19:23

Re: On This Day...

It's purely elementary as Holmes said to his assistant Dr. Watson on his deductive powers of reasoning, Schnaps7 lol.Thumb up

24.05.2018, 17:02

Re: On This Day...

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May 24, 1844. Samuel F.B. Morse Sent the First Telegraphic Message ...

What was the first telegraph message? Sent by inventor Samuel F.B. Morse on May 24, 1844, over an
experimental line from Washington, D.C., to Baltimore, the message said: "What hath God wrought?"

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Taken from the Bible, Numbers 23:23, and recorded on a paper tape, the phrase had been suggested to Morse
by Annie Ellsworth, the young daughter of a friend. The success of the experiment would change forever the
national communication system. But Morse wasn't just interested in the telegraph.

22.05.2018, 16:08

Re: On This Day...

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Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is born ...

It’s the birthday of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of master sleuth Sherlock Holmes.

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Doyle was born in Scotland and studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh, where he met Dr. Joseph Bell,
a teacher with extraordinary deductive reasoning power. Bell partly inspired Doyle’s character Sherlock Holmes
years later. His first Sherlock Holmes story, A Study in Scarlet, was published in Beeton’s Christmas Annual in 1887.
Starting in 1891, a series of Holmes stories appeared in The Strand magazine. Holmes enabled Doyle to leave
his medical practice in 1891 and devote himself to writing.

28.04.2018, 09:34

Re: On This Day...

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1521. Magellan killed in the Philippines ...

On this day, after traveling three-quarters of the way around the globe, Portuguese navigator
Ferdinand Magellan is killed during a tribal skirmish on Mactan Island in the Philippines.

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Earlier in the month, his ships had dropped anchor at the Philippine island of Cebu, and Magellan
met with the local chief, who after converting to Christianity persuaded the Europeans to assist
him in conquering a rival tribe on the neighboring island of Mactan. In the subsequent fighting,
Magellan was hit by a poisoned arrow and left to die by his retreating comrades.

25.04.2018, 13:34

Re: On This Day...

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1719. Robinson Crusoe is published...

Daniel Defoe’s fictional work "The Life and Strange Adventures of Robinson Crusoe" was published
on this day. Despite its simple narrative style, Robinson Crusoe was well received in the literary world
and is often credited as marking the beginning of realistic fiction as a literary genre. It is generally
seen as a contender for the first English novel.

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The book, about a shipwrecked sailor who spends 28 years on a deserted island, is based on the experiences
of shipwreck victims and of Alexander Selkirk, a Scottish sailor who spent four years on a small island off
the coast of South America in the early 1700s.

19.04.2018, 16:20

Re: On This Day...

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British explorer Captain James Cook first sights Australia ...

On the 19th April 1770, the British explorer Captain James Cook first caught sight of Australia.
The problem was, Cook and his crew had been at sea for nearly 2 years, having sailed west
from Britain across the Atlantic to South America, and then onwards across the southern Pacific.

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By the time they arrived on the south-east coast of Australia, they had – in a calendar – skipped
a day. According to some sources, therefore, Cook arrived in Australia on April 20th.

02.04.2018, 20:33

Re: On This Day...

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1513. Ponce de Leon discovers Florida ...

On this day near present-day St. Augustine, Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de Leon comes ashore on the
Florida coast, and claims the territory for the Spanish crown. Although other European navigators may
have sighted the Florida peninsula before, Ponce de Leon is credited with the first recorded landing and
the first detailed exploration of the Florida coast.

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The Spanish explorer was searching for the “Fountain of Youth,” a fabled water source that was said to bring
eternal youth. Ponce de Leon named the peninsula he believed to be an island “La Florida” because his
discovery came during the time of the Easter feast, or Pascua Florida.

28.03.2018, 16:12

Re: On This Day...

Cry

845. Siege of Paris ...

The Siege of Paris and the Sack of Paris of March 28. 845 was the culmination of a Viking invasion of the kingdom
of the West Franks. The Viking forces were led by a Danish chieftain named "Reginherus", or Ragnar,
who traditionally has been identified with the legendary saga character Ragnar Lodbrok. Ragnar's fleet
of 120 Viking ships, carrying thousands of men, entered the Seine in March and proceeded sailing up the river.

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The West Frankish king Charles the Bald assembled a smaller army in response, but as the Vikings defeated
one division, comprising half of the army, the remaining forces retreated. The Vikings reached Paris at the
end of the month, during Easter. After plundering and occupying the city, the Vikings finally withdrew after
receiving a ransom payment of 7,000 French livres (2,570 kilograms or 5,670 pounds) of silver and gold from Charles the Bald.

27.03.2018, 14:33

Re: On This Day...

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1st successful blood transfusion ...

On 27 March 1914, Belgian doctor Albert Hustin conducted the first non-direct transfusion, using
sodium citrate as an anticoagulant. Initially, blood transfusions needed to be made directly from the
donor to the receiver before coagulation occurred.

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However, in the 1910s, it was discovered that adding anticoagulant to blood and refrigerating it allowed
for longer storage times, which led to the establishment of blood banks.

25.03.2018, 19:02

Re: On This Day...

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March 25. 31 AD. 1st Easter, according to calendar-maker Dionysius Exiguus ...

Almost the whole world uses the style of counting the years that
was invented by the Scythian monk Dionysius Exiguus.

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He was part of a group of Scythian monks, including Joannes Maxentius,
who played an influential role in Christian theological disputes between the
4th and 6th centuries. Dionysius invented the Anno Domini count (A.D.)

23.03.2018, 16:30

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OK enters national vernacular ...

On this day in 1839, the initials “O.K.” are
first published in The Boston Morning Post.

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Meant as an abbreviation for “oll korrect,” a
popular slang misspelling of “all correct” at the time,
OK steadily made its way into the everyday speech of Americans.

20.03.2018, 16:21

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Cool

Black Death is created, allegedly ...

According to scholars at the University of Paris, the Black Death is created on this day in 1345,
from what they call “a triple conjunction of Saturn, Jupiter and Mars in the 40th degree of Aquarius,
occurring on the 20th of March 1345″.

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The Black Death, also known as the Plague, swept across Europe, the Middle East and Asia during
the 14th century, leaving an estimated 25 million dead in its wake.

15.03.2018, 15:17

Re: On This Day...

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The ides of March - Julius Caesar is murdered...

On this day, 44 B.C. - Julius Caesar, the”dictator for life”of the Roman Empire, is murdered by his own
senators at a meeting in a hall next to Pompey’s Theatre. The conspiracy against Caesar encompassed
as many as sixty noblemen, including Caesar’s own protege, Marcus Brutus.

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Marcus Brutus wounded Caesar in the groin and Caesar is said to have remarked in Greek, “You, too, my child?”
In the aftermath of the assassination, Antony attempted to carry out Caesar’s legacy. However, Caesar’s will
left Octavian in charge as his adopted son. Cassius and Brutus tried to rally a Republican army and Brutus even
issued coins celebrating the assassination, known as the Ides of March.