On This Day...

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22.10.2013, 18:23

On This Day...

Quite simple really,Historical events on this dayBig Grin

1964, Sandie Shaw had her first UK No.1 single with the Burt Bacharach song '(There's) Always Some Thing There To Remind Me'.
1964, The Who, then known as The High Numbers, receive a letter from EMI Records, asking them for original material after their recent audition for the company.

1966, The Supremes became the first female group to have a No.1 album on the US char whith 'The Supremes a Go Go', knocking The Beatles 'Revolver', from the top of the charts. 
1966, The Beach Boys ‘Good Vibrations’ made its debut on the US singles chart. Written by Brian Wilson and Mike Love, the track was recorded over 6 weeks in four different Los Angeles studios, at a cost of over $16,000. The recording engineer would later say that the last take sounded exactly like the first, six months earlier. The record would reach No.1 on the US charts in December 1966. 

1969, American singer Tommy Edwards died after suffering a brain aneurysm in Henrico County, Virginia, at the age of 47. Had the 1958 US & UK No.1 single 'It's All In The Game'.
1969, Paul McCartney publicly denied rumors that he was dead. The most recent of many "clues" of this Death Hoax was the fact that he was the only barefoot Beatle on the newly released 'Abby Road' LP cover. The story was actually started as a prank by Fred La Bour, a sports and arts writer for the student paper, The Michigan Daily at the University of Michigan.
1969, Led Zeppelin II was released on Atlantic Records in the UK. The Jimmy Page-produced album which was recorded over six months between four European and three American tours, peaked at No.1 in both the UK and US, going on to sell over 12 million copies in the US alone, (and spending 138 weeks on the UK chart). The album is now recognised by writers and music critics as one of the greatest and most influential rock albums ever recorded.

1986, Jane Dornacker was killed in a helicopter crash during a live traffic report for WNBC radio in New York. Listeners heard the terrified voice of Dornacker screaming "Hit the water, hit the water’ as the helicopter from which she and pilot Bill Pate were reporting, fell from the sky and crashed into the Hudson River. Dornacker had been a member of The Tubes and Leila And The Snakes.

1988, Phil Collins started a two week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Groovy Kind Of Love', his 6th US No.1. 
1988, U2 scored their fourth UK No.1 album with the double set and film soundtrack 'Rattle And Hum', featuring their first UK No.1 single 'Desire'. 

1989, English folk singer, songwriter, poet, and record producer Ewan MacColl died aged 74. He wrote 'Dirty Old Town' and 'The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face', (became a No.1 hit for Roberta Flack in 1972). Acts including Planxty, The Dubliners, Elvis Presley and Johnny Cash recorded his songs. He was the father of singer, songwriter Kirsty MacColl.

1990, Pearl Jam played their first ever concert when they appeared at the Off Ramp in Seattle. 

1993, Oasis signed a six-album deal with Creation Records for a £40,000 advance. 1996, It was announced that, "The Beatles were now bigger than The Beatles". The statement was based on sales so far this year, having sold 6,000,000 albums from their back catalog and a combined total of 13,000,000 copies of ‘The Beatles Anthology 1’ and ‘The Beatles Anthology 2’. With the release of ‘The Beatles Anthology 3’ a week away, it was anticipated that total Beatles album sales for 1996 would exceed 20 million. A poll showed 41 percent of sales were to teenagers who were not born when The Beatles officially called it quits in 1970. 

1999, it was reported that Sinead O'Connor was attempting to buy the church where she was ordained into the Catholic sisterhood. The church was on the market for £70,000. 

2000, George Michael paid £1.45m for the Steinway piano on which John Lennon wrote 'Imagine.' George said, "I know that when my fingers touch the keys of that Steinway, I will feel truly blessed. And parting with my money has never been much of a problem, just ask my accountant." The singer outbid Robbie Williams and The Oasis brothers.
 2000, Pearl Jam appeared at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas, California, celebrating the tenth anniversary of their first live performance as a band.

2003, Elliot Smith, US singer songwriter, committed suicide aged 34. One time member of Stranger Than Fiction, solo 1997 album 'Either/Or'.

2005, Waterloo by Abba was voted the best song in the history of the Eurovision Song Contest. Viewers in 31 countries across Europe voted during a special show in Copenhagen to celebrate the annual event's 50th birthday. 

2008, A homeless man claimed a £2,000 reward by returning a waxwork head of ex-Beatle Sir Paul McCartney which had been left on a train. Anthony Silva found the item in a bin at Reading station after auctioneer Joby Carter left it under a seat at Maidenhead station. The homeless man thought it was a Halloween mask and had been using it as a pillow before realising what it was. The wax model sold the following week for £5,500 at auction.

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18.10.2017, 14:55

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U.S. takes possession of Alaska ...

On this day in 1867, the U.S. formally takes possession of Alaska after purchasing the territory from Russia for $7.2 million,
or less than two cents an acre. The Alaska purchase comprised 586,412 square miles, about twice the size of Texas, and
was championed by William Henry Seward, the enthusiasticly expansionist secretary of state under President Andrew Johnson.

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Russia wanted to sell its Alaska territory, which was remote, sparsely populated and difficult to defend, to the U.S. rather
than risk losing it in battle with a rival such as Great Britain. However, the American public believed the land to be barren
and worthless and dubbed the purchase “Seward’s Folly” and “Andrew Johnson’s Polar Bear Garden,” among other derogatory
names. Some animosity toward the project may have been a byproduct of President Johnson’s own unpopularity.

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Public opinion of the purchase turned more favorable when gold was discovered in a tributary of Alaska’s
Klondike River in 1896, sparking a gold rush. Alaska became the 49th state on January 3, 1959, and is
now recognized for its vast natural resources.

17.10.2017, 16:18

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The first resolution formally creating the Texas Rangers is approved ...

On this day in 1835, Texans approve a resolution to create the Texas Rangers, a corps of armed and
mounted lawmen designed to “range and guard the frontier between the Brazos and Trinity Rivers.”

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In the midst of their revolt against Mexico, Texan leaders felt they needed a semi-official force of armed
men who would defend the isolated frontier settlers of the Lone Star Republic against both Santa Ana’s
soldiers and hostile Indians; the Texas Rangers filled this role.

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But after winning their revolutionary war with Mexico the following year,
Texans decided to keep the Rangers, both to defend against Indian and Mexican
raiders and to serve as the principal law enforcement authority along the sparsely populated Texan frontier.

12.10.2017, 16:43

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1492. Columbus reaches the New World ...

On this day, after sailing across the Atlantic Ocean, Italian explorer Christopher Columbus sights a Bahamian island,
believing he has reached East Asia. His expedition went ashore the same day and claimed the land for Isabella and
Ferdinand of Spain, who sponsored his attempt to find a western ocean route to China, India, and the fabled gold
and spice islands of Asia.

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On August 3, 1492, Columbus set sail from Palos, Spain, with three small ships, the Santa Maria, the Pinta, and the Nina.
On October 12, the expedition reached land, probably Watling Island in the Bahamas. Later that month, Columbus sighted
Cuba, which he thought was mainland China, and in December the expedition landed on Hispaniola, which Columbus
thought might be Japan. He established a small colony there with 39 of his men. The explorer returned to Spain with gold,
spices, and “Indian” captives in March 1493 and was received with the highest honors by the Spanish court. He was the
first European to explore the Americas since the Vikings set up colonies in Greenland and Newfoundland in the 10th century.

09.10.2017, 10:23

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On This Day - October 9, was born the legendary leader of "The Beatles" - John Lennon ...

John Winston Ono Lennon was born in war-time England, on 9 October 1940,
at Liverpool Maternity Hospital, to Julia (née Stanley) and Alfred Lennon.

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Julia Lennon taught her son to play the banjo, and they shared a love of Elvis Presley's music.
The first song he learned to play was Fats Domino's Ain't That A Shame.

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Lennon's first school was Dovedale Primary School, and upon passing his 11 Plus attended Quarry
Bank Grammar School (1952-1957). He formed The Quarrymen in March 1957, and in July the
same year met Paul McCartney at the garden fete at St Peter's Church in Woolton, Liverpool.

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The pair quickly bonded, and began rehearsing and writing songs together at McCartney's home at 20 Forthlin Road.
Lennon's first completed song was Hello Little Girl, later a hit for the Fourmost. McCartney also introduced Lennon to
George Harrison, and convinced him to let the young guitarist join the group, eventually named [hidden link - please register] after a series of other names were rejected.

08.10.2017, 09:54

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Great Chicago Fire begins ...

On this day in 1871, flames spark in the Chicago barn of Patrick and Catherine O’Leary, igniting a two-day
blaze that kills between 200 and 300 people, destroys 17,450 buildings, leaves 100,000 homeless and
causes an estimated $200 million (in 1871 dollars; $3 billion in 2007 dollars) in damages.

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Legend has it that a cow kicked over a lantern in the O’Leary barn and started the fire, but other theories
hold that humans or even a comet may have been responsible for the event that left four square miles of
the Windy City, including its business district, in ruins.

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Dry weather and an abundance of wooden buildings, streets and sidewalks made Chicago vulnerable to fire.
The city averaged two fires per day in 1870; there were 20 fires throughout Chicago the week before the Great Fire of 1871.

06.10.2017, 15:21

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First U.S. train robbery ...

On this day in 1866, the Reno gang carries out the first robbery of a moving train in the U.S., making
off with over $10,000 from an Ohio & Mississippi train in Jackson County, Indiana. Prior to this
innovation in crime, holdups had taken place only on trains sitting at stations or freight yards.

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This new method of sticking up moving trains in remote locations low on law enforcement soon
became popular in the American West, where the recently constructed transcontinental and regional
railroads made attractive targets.

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Some gangs, like Butch Cassidy’s Wild Bunch, found robbing trains so easy and lucrative that,
for a time, they made it their criminal specialty. Railroad owners eventually got wise and fought
back, protecting their trains’ valuables with large safes, armed guards and even specially fortified
boxcars. Consequently, by the late 1800s, robbing trains had turned into an increasingly tough and dangerous job.

04.10.2017, 15:00

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Oct 04. 1957. Sputnik launched ...

The Soviet Union inaugurates the “Space Age” with its launch of Sputnik, the world’s first artificial satellite.
The spacecraft, named Sputnik after the Russian word for “satellite,” was launched at 10:29 p.m. Moscow
time from the Tyuratam launch base in the Kazakh Republic.

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Sputnik transmitted radio signals back to Earth strong enough to be picked up by amateur radio operators.
Those in the United States with access to such equipment tuned in and listened in awe as the beeping
Soviet spacecraft passed over America several times a day. In January 1958, Sputnik’s orbit deteriorated,
as expected, and the spacecraft burned up in the atmosphere.

03.10.2017, 16:35

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East and West Germany reunite after 45 years ...

Less than one year after the destruction of the Berlin Wall, East and West Germany come together
on what is known as “Unity Day.” Since 1945, when Soviet forces occupied eastern Germany, and
the United States and other Allied forces occupied the western half of the nation at the close of World War II,
divided Germany had come to serve as one of the most enduring symbols of the Cold War.

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With the gradual waning of Soviet power in the late 1980s, the Communist Party in East Germany began
to lose its grip on power. Tens of thousands of East Germans began to flee the nation, and by late 1989
the Berlin Wall started to come down.

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Two months following reunification, all-German elections took place and Helmut Kohl became the first
chancellor of the reunified Germany. Although this action came more than a year before the dissolution
of the Soviet Union, for many observers the reunification of Germany effectively marked the end of the Cold War.

19.09.2017, 18:27

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1790 - Alexander Radishchev, Russian author and social critic, was arrested and exiled to Siberia under Catherine the Great for the publication in 1790 of his 'Journey from St. Petersburg to Moscow', often referred to as a Russian 'Uncle Tom's Cabin', in which he raised the issues in government and governance, social structure and personal freedom and liberty. The book was immediately banned and Radishchev sentenced, first to death, then to banishment in eastern Siberia. It was not freely published in Russia until 1905.

29.07.2017, 08:49

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NASA created ...

On this day in 1958, the U.S. Congress passes legislation establishing the National Aeronautics
and Space Administration (NASA), a civilian agency responsible for coordinating America’s
activities in space. NASA has since sponsored space expeditions, both human and mechanical,
that have yielded vital information about the solar system and universe.

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It has also launched numerous earth-orbiting satellites that have been instrumental in everything
from weather forecasting to navigation to global communications.

28.07.2017, 16:33

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Britain is introduced to the potato ...

On This Day 28 July 1586 - Sir Thomas Harriot stepped off the boat in Plymouth.
He had just returned from Sir Walter Raleigh’s English colony on Roanoke Island
in modern-day North Carolina, where he had made detailed studies of the wildlife – and potatoes.

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In the months that followed, Harriot recorded his adventures in A Briefe and True Report
of the New Found Land of Virginia. In it, he described a curious tuber:

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“Openavk are kind of roots of round forme, some of the bignes of walnuts, some far
greater, which are found in moist & marish grounds growing many together one by
another in ropes, or as thogh they were a string. Being boiled or sodden they are very good meate.”

27.07.2017, 16:55

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Happy Birthday Hamburger ...

Louis Lassen of Louis' Lunch, a small lunch wagon in New Haven, Connecticut, is said to have sold the
first hamburger and steak sandwich in the U.S. of July 27. 1900.

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New York magazine states that "The dish actually had no name until some rowdy sailors from Hamburg
named the meat on a bun after themselves years later", noting also that this claim is subject to dispute.
A customer ordered a quick hot meal and Louis was out of steaks. Taking ground beef trimmings,
Louis made a patty and grilled it, putting it between two slices of toast.

26.07.2017, 16:56

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The Surrey Iron Railway ...

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The Surrey Iron Railway, arguably the world's first public railway, opens in south London.

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It was a toll railway on which carriers used horse traction. The chief goods transported were coal, building materials, lime, manure, corn and seeds.

24.07.2017, 16:33

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Machu Picchu discovered ...

On July 24, 1911, American archeologist Hiram Bingham gets his first look at Machu Picchu, an ancient
Inca settlement in Peru that is now one of the world’s top tourist destinations.

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Tucked away in the rocky countryside northwest of Cuzco, Machu Picchu is believed to have been a summer
retreat for Inca leaders, whose civilization was virtually wiped out by Spanish invaders in the 16th century.
For hundreds of years afterwards, its existence was a secret known only to the peasants living in the region.
That all changed in the summer of 1911, when Bingham arrived with a small team of explorers to search for the famous “lost” cities of the Incas.